Education & Training

          As fume hood experts, we know that the more you know and understand about the fume hood system the better prepared you will be to do your job, and you will be much safer doing it.  We want you to be safe in your work and to be proud of being Fume Hood Certified.  We don’t allow kids to drive without education and training; working in the lab with fume hoods is equally as hazardous. Education lasts a lifetime.  We want you to be a lifetime learner, because the more you know the safer you will be and the more valuable your experience will be to your employer and those who work with you.

          The Fume Hood Certified Team has been training for years. Whether it is a seminar, workshop, conference or customized in-person training, we have trained fume hood stakeholders in many subjects relating to fume hoods; laboratory safety, laboratory ventilation and fume hood testing.

 

Here are some of the topics we have trained on.

Click headings to expand, click again to collapse.

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Teaching Labs - For Teachers and Students
High School Student Training
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This is a free course for high school students taking a general chemistry class. It gives students exposure to some of the fume hood safety basics and makes them aware of the dangers in the lab.

High School Teacher Training
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This is a free course for high school teachers. This course alerts teachers to their personal liability risks, provides insights into minimizing those risks and how to decrease the likelihood of an accident in the lab.

College Student Training
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This training is for non-Chemistry Majors taking introductory lab classes. This exposes the student to hazards in the lab and provides an overview on lab safety with a focus on the fume hood.

College Science Major or Graduate Student Training
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This course offers in-depth instruction with a greater focus on the user’s actions while working with fume hoods. Given that the user is a critical component of the ventilation system and its’ performance, the student will be taught to determine how their behavior in and around the hood impacts the overall system’s performance and their own safety.

Instructor & Teaching Assistant Training
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By focusing on how student’s actions impact safety, this course focuses on observing potential fume hood issues relative to operation and how to address them to make a safer lab.

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EHS and Safety
Fume Hoods 101 For EHS & Safety Officers
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This is an overview of the fume hood both as a PPE and an Engineering Control for exposure control. It is a holistic view of all the components that make ventilation systems work efficiently and safely.

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Facility Management and Maintenance
Laboratory Ventilation For Facility Management and Maintenance
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A holistic overview of how the fume hood interfaces with the mechanical system and how air balance and room conditions are critical to the safe performance of a fume hood. This course will also cover hood labeling and proper record keeping of the hood’s maintenance history.

Roofs With Fume Hood Stacks Pose Additional Risks
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Since hazardous chemicals are being exhausted on the roof from the hood, there are extra risks that need to be understood by those doing work on the roof. This course will examine those factors which need to be addressed prior to working near exhaust stacks.

Identifying Which Fans Support Which Hoods
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It is very important to know which hoods and which fans are related. If there is a problem or a need for service, the people using the hood and the people doing the work need to be on the same page. This course explores options for the proper labeling of hoods and exhaust fans.

The Dos and Don’ts of Fume Hood Stacks
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Much trouble and expense go into getting hazardous materials out of the building. Poor stack design can cause re-entrainment, causing the hazardous chemicals to be drawn back into the building. This course focuses on stack design and what is needed to minimize the risk of re-entrainment.

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Research and Medical Labs
PI/Researcher Training
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These courses are geared for the career scientists and technicians. This instruction goes in-depth as to how fume hoods work, their relation to the overall ventilation system, assuring personal safety while using the hood and their role in maintaining the hood’s safe performance.

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Fume Hood Tester
Fume Hood Testing Basics
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What are you really testing? There are numerous tests that can be performed on a fume hood; smoke visualization, face velocity profile, cross drafts, VAV response time and containment tests - but what does each test mean? We explore the meaning of the tests, what they indicate and why they are important.

ASHRAE 110 – 2016 Explained
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ASHRAE 110 is a complex testing protocol - it is not a pass/fail test. These guidelines instruct us how to perform the tests and under what conditions. We take a deep dive into the standard and give you all the details behind what you are doing, and why. We also offer insight into the ASHRAE AM-AI-AU versions.

What You Need to Know to Be a Fume Hood Tester
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Being a credible fume hood tester involves a good understanding of a hood’s function, as well as good equipment. This course walks you through the basics of fume hood testing and introduces you to the equipment required to properly test.

Testing With the New ASHRAE 110 IPA Protocol
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Changes are underway to switch from SF6 gas for leak detection to IPA - Isopropyl Alcohol. This is a more environmentally friendly alternative. This change dramatically impacts the equipment and how the test is performed. To learn more, this course is for you.

Z9.5 Explained
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The Z9.5 Laboratory Ventilation Standard is a comprehensive standard that addresses all aspects of the laboratory ventilation system. This standard is the go-to for most other standards. Our course explores what is in the standard, how to use it, and the highlights you need to know.

In-house Testing and Inspections
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We teach you everything you need to know to do your own fume hood inspections and certify the fume hood’s performance. We have also developed a fume hood labeling program for in-house testers.

Troubleshooting Fume Hood Failure
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You are testing a fume hood and it fails to perform - the customer asks what is wrong. This course is an overview of the common causes of failure and what to do about them. Given the complexities of the overall system and the room conditions, identifying the root cause of failure is one of the more challenging tasks. We offer insight into troubleshooting hood failure.

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General Topics
What To Do in Case of a Fume Hood Fire
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Fume hood fires are all too common. With proper training and good procedures in place, a small fire becomes a non-event rather than a major incident. We explore some of the causes of fire, what can be done to minimize the effects of the fire, and what to do to keep all the building occupants safe and minimize damage to the lab.

What About Face Velocity, Does It Matter?
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Face velocity has been a bellwether of fume hood safety, but it is just one of the many indicators. Face velocity matters, but not the specific number. We explore what that number is really telling you and how it relates to safety.

Basic Lab Safety
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There are many courses offering instruction on basic lab safety, but none of these courses focus on fume hoods. We recognize the fact that when you come to us for fume hood training you might want some basic safety training as well, but we take a little different approach.

What Is the Difference Between VAV and CAV?
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There are two basic concepts in ventilation; CAV or Constant Air Volume and VAV or Variable Air Volume. These two concepts behave very differently. It is important for you to understand which you are working with. We explore both concepts and their impact on performance.

The More You Know the Safer You Will Be
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The more you become aware of the dangers and hazards in the lab the better prepared you will be to do things that improve your safety and minimize the likelihood of an incident. Think of it as driver’s training for the lab.

Impact of Lab Design on Fume Hood Safety
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There are elements of lab design that impact the fume hood’s performance: location of hoods in relation to each other, corners, doors, and traffic patterns. We also have issues of cross drafts caused by supply registers. We look at things that can be done to minimize the impact of poor design.

How To Do a Self-Performed Fume Hood Safety Audit
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Many pieces of equipment require a daily safety check before using it. You should have a daily checklist for your fume hood as well. Once a month, you should be doing a brief safety audit and, at least annually, you should have a third party doing a more complete inspection. We instruct what tests need to be accomplished and how to do the inspection.

Laboratory Ventilation Systems
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This is a master course for those who want to achieve a deep understanding of the complete lab ventilation system in a holistic way. This comprehensive program gives you the knowledge you need to become an expert in fume hood issues.

Fume Hood Best Practices
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Collectively touring thousands of labs, we have been exposed to many great practices. We have developed a comprehensive list of what we consider the best practices that we have seen worldwide. Here is where we share them with you.

Sash Management
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The sash is a physical protective barrier. It is the user’s best protection. The sash is also the key component in controlling energy usage. We explore sash management concepts that improve user safety and improve energy efficiency.

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Short Courses
What Causes Fume Hood Fires?
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A quick look at some of the causes of fires in hoods. We explore the LEL (Lower Explosion Limit) and other factors that increase the likelihood of a fire and how to minimize the chances of having a fire.

Using A Radioisotope Hood
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This is a hood for special applications involving radioactive materials . We look at what makes it different and how to use it properly. Generally, these hoods should not be used for general chemistry applications and we discuss why.

Using A Perchloric Acid Hood
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This is a specialized hood for a special application. We look at what makes it different and how to use it properly. This is the most dangerous hood application in the lab. Using this hood and it’s wash-down system properly are key to not having an incident.

Using A Fire Extinguisher for A Hood Fire
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Proper and timely use of a fire extinguisher can keep a small hood fire from developing into a major event. Most people have never actually used a fire extinguisher and lack the knowledge and confidence to use it properly in a timely way. We help you understand what to do to gain the confidence to properly use an extinguisher.

The Sash Is Your Friend
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The sash is the user’s most direct interface with the hood, but it does more than anything else to protect the user from hazards and conserve energy. It is the most important feature from the user’s perspective. This course guides you in proper sash usage to keep you safe and conserve energy.

Re-entrainment
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We go to great lengths and expense to exhaust hazardous chemicals outside.  Unfortunately, poor design in exhaust stacks and supply air intakes cause those hazardous chemicals to be pulled right back into the building. This is defined as re-entrainment. Learn about re-entrainment with this course.

Face Velocity and Fume Containment
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There is no direct relationship between face velocity and containment.  In fact, almost half of the hoods that fail to contain have the specified face velocity. Learn the face velocity vs. containment relationship with this course.

Why Is Testing Necessary?
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A hood’s performance is a direct function of how well the laboratory ventilation system is functioning. There are many components that make the system work; valves, controls and sensors - all of which can get out of calibration or fail. At the hood, there is no way to know how well the system is performing without testing. We offer a practical approach to testing that will help ensure your hood is performing safely.

Why Training Is a Best Practice?
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There are many tasks we would not ask a person to do without at least some training. Working in a fume hood is one of those. Every year there are too many preventable accidents because people are not properly trained. We make a case for not only why training is good thing, but why it will save money.

Why Are There More Accidents in Educational Labs?
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In the last 20 years, there were almost 200 reported incidents, with about 500 people seriously hurt and 10 deaths. 80% of those incidents occurred in educational labs. We surmise the reason for this is that in the educational environment there is less emphasis put on training and safety than in commercial labs. We make a case for increased training in the educational labs.

What You Don’t Know and You Can’t See CAN Hurt You
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Most hazardous chemicals are invisible and many are odorless. It is likely that if your hood is losing containment, you would not know it. If you are inhaling these chemicals, it could cause long term illness and even death. Few studies have been done, but one such study indicated that those who spent their career working in a lab have a 10-year shorter lifespan than others of their age. You need to be aware of what you are working with and how to protect yourself.

Fume Hoods and Black Mold
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Have a problem with black mold?  When a fume hood’s exhaust volume is not matched with the supply volume the building goes negative, when this occurs, the building sucks in unconditioned air and contributes to mold problems. Let us explain it to you.

It’s All About ACH (Air Changes per Hour)
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Sometimes, we can’t see the forest for the trees.  While our focus may be on energy usage, there is a direct relationship between the risk of exposure to dangerous chemicals and the total number of ACH.  We explore this relationship so you can make better decisions about fume hoods and their usage.

Safety Showers and Eyewashes
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Accidents happen and these two safety devices are key to a good outcome or a
horrible problem.  Just like hoods, these devices need regular testing, along with proper documentation.  The same is true for training, if you don’t use it correctly the outcome will not be what it could have been.

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Buying and Selling Fume Hoods
How To Read An ASRAE 110 Report
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How many times do we see the requirement for a hood supplier to provide an ASHRAE 110 report? But few really understand how to read it. If you have three reports, how can you look at the reports and tell what is a better product? We explain how to understand the results of the test to determine the performance of the hood.

How To Specify Fume Hoods
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All hoods are created equal, but it is not only the hood that you need to consider. How it is installed and how well you are trained on that hood goes a long way to having a properly performing hood. We offer insights into how to specify a fume hood in a way that helps you get the best performing hood.

What You Need to Know to Properly Sell Fume Hoods
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Selling fume hoods is a difficult task because it is not a standalone device.  It is hard to make claims because the fume hood only performs as well as the laboratory ventilation system will allow it to.  We help you understand fume hoods in a holistic way and help you differentiate your product from the others.

Questions You Should Ask Before Selecting Your Next Hood
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Ask the wrong question and you get the wrong answer. Knowing what is important helps assure you that the product you purchase is best for your needs. An educated buyer makes the best buyer.

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Energy Savings and Safety
The Tradeoff Between Energy Savings and Safety
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The cost of energy and the desire to be greener, in recent years, has shifted much of the focus away from safety to energy usage, but you cannot have the best of both worlds. By understanding what drives safety and what drives energy usage, you can choose a ventilation strategy that maximizes both.

ECD-Exposure Control Devices
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This a broad category of devices that provide different levels of protection depending on the hazard levels. A fume hood is an ECD. We offer a complete overview of ECDs and how to determine what is right for you.

Setting Up a Risk-Based Exposure Control System (ASHRAE Standard)
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The ASHRAE standard “Classification of Laboratory Ventilation Levels” classifies exposure risks on a Level of 0 to 4. Very similar to the BSL 1-4 classification for biological safety, this  classification acknowledges that all risks are not the same and the level of protection should not be the same.  This strategy offers an opportunity to segment lab work by risk and control the areas accordingly. This is the best concept is maintaining a high level of safety while greatly reducing energy usage.

Customized Training - Virtual, In-Person and Hybrid

Our business is education and training.  We are here to help you solve your problems.  Whatever your needs may be, we can develop a customized program designed for your situation.  We would be glad to create a proposal tailored specifically to your needs.

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The one recourse you cannot go without!

Laboratory Fume Hoods Explained

The first book of its kind! A step by step approach to explaining the interface between the fume hood, the laboratory ventilation system, and the building HVAC. Chip Albright's holistic approach to the subject is refreshing and effective. If you own or work in a laboratory, this book is required reading.

We've Got You Covered! But You Can Also Help Us.

Many topics are covered in our online programs, others are in-person training.  If you have requirements or suggestions, please let us know.  When we develop new online courses, we first develop a pilot program to test them.  If you are interested in being a pilot tester, please let us know.